Visiting the National 9/11 Memorial

Reflecting Absence: Designing the National 9/11 Memorial

September 11 may not be the best day to visit the National 9/11 Memorial. But don’t let tourist crowds discourage you from seeing this important and dramatic tribute to victims of terrorism. Even on New York City’s busiest days, the dark voids and cascading waterfalls create a sense of deep reverence.

Architect Michael Arad and his team faced many challenges during the design and construction of the memorial. To learn how the vision became a reality, see: Reflecting Absence: Designing the National 9/11 Memorial

[Photo above: National 9/11 Memorial in September 2013. Copyright Jackie Craven]

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Celebrate Eero Saarinen

Gateway Arch in St. Louis, MO

Curving, organic shapes are the hallmark of Finnish-American architect Eero Saarinen. You may know him for grand, swooping structures like the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri, or the Dulles International Airport near Washington D.C.

However, Saarinen also designed on a smaller scale. He began his career designing furniture with Charles Eames. By the 1960s, Saarinen’s Tulip Chair became a classic interior design motif.

Learn about Eero Saarinen

See works designed by Eero Saarinen

 

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Eisenman’s Chilling Memorial

Berlin Holocaust Memorial

Who is Peter Eisenman? Is he a “Structuralist”? A “Deconstructionist”? A “Postmodern theorist”? The venerable architect may be difficult to classify, but his works demand attention.

Eisenman’s Berlin Holocaust Memorial (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe) is both abstract and chilling. Composed of 2,711 enormous stone slabs, the Berlin memorial opened in 2005 and continues to stir controversy.

Learn about Peter Eisenman >>

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